Bridal Creeper on Death Row! Hope So.

We have begun to fightback with the information and expertise gained from Kayla Ringrose from Southern Dirt inDSC00740 Kojonup.   We are using a combination approach with both the recommended chemical application away from the waterways and spore water near the Tone River, Cockatoo Creek and Muir’s Brook (waterways on the property).

Bridal creeper has the relatively unusual ability to invade undisturbed native bushland. Dispersal of seeds by native birds enables it to reach remote and inaccessible places. Once established, the stems and foliage smother native seedlings and understorey plants, and the aggressive tuberous root system forms dense, impenetrable mats, inhibiting the establishment of native trees and shrubs. Underground tuber reserves enable the plant to survive unfavourable conditions for many years, while fragments of underground rhizomes can be spread inadvertently in soil or mulch to begin new infestations.

Bridal CreeDSC00738per is on WONS (Weeds of National Significance) one of the worst environmental weeds, posing a serious threat to our biodiversity. If you have some please consider taking up the challenge to get rid of it. Plenty of great info online to help you.

These photos were taken on a recent trip to the farm on November 27th. You can see some progress however we are well aware this will take maybe years to control. We are lucky that spore infected plants are already on the property so we did not have to search!

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Southern Dirt/State NRM Project

Southern Dirt/State NRM Project.

via Southern Dirt/State NRM Project.

Creepy Bridal Creeper……

Kayla showing the way

Kayla showing the way

yes we have some and yes we are getting rid of it……
Seems crazy to think that this weed was still used in bridal bouquets in the 1990’s. Originally introduced into Australia in 1895 and sold commercially in nurseries from 1905 it is now out of control and strangling everything it wraps itself around. Yes it may look pretty however the affects on our native bush are devastating. It literally smothers everything it envelops
Yesterday we joined with a number of concerned caring citizens at Lesser Hall, Kojonup to become better informed and equipped to deal with Bridal Creeper. it is on the national weed register Australia wide and in the top twenty of nasties we need to try and control.
Southern Dirt applied for a grant from the State National Resource Management (NRM) office to raise awareness within the local community. They are working closely with the Kojonup Shire to reduce the spread of the weed.
Kayla from Southern Dirt gave us a detailed information session in the morning on various control methods.
Personally we were very keen to learn about the biological control of the weed using spore water. I had read about it but did not know where to purchase it and was hoping to come back to the farm with some! Well thankful it is much simpler than that. The Spore water is easily made, all we needed was some rust infected Bridal Creeper. If you are interested you can obtain information from your local DAFWA Biosecurity officer. To assist there is plenty of information available online from http://www.weeds.org.au/WoNS/ . Another great resource if you are outside the Kojonup district is to contact your local Landcare officer, shire council even YouTube. Put Bridal Creeper biological control in to the search box and some excellent information comes up. The big stress is that it can take up to seven years to control a single bridal creeper plant. Persistence plus is required.
A big thank-you to the Country Kitchen who supplied a great selection of scones to fuel us up for the field trip.
Kayla had been out earlier and set up the site for us, collecting rust infected bridal creeper to put into the large buckets or rain water, swirl it in the water, strain into the pump packs and of we set spraying up and down Denny Road. A few of the local farmers joined us as they wanted to know what we were up to. This really is about awareness, once they were shown the creeper, they, like us spotted it everywhere. This was also our experience. We thought we had one small patch, then we we really looked we noted just how far it had spread. It is easily spread. We came down from Perth the night before especially for this workshop. Kayla helped us collect some rust infect creeper to bring back to the farm. From July through to September is the optimal time to collect the rust infected plants. The great thing about this method is no other plant is affected.
If you are in the Kojonup district and want more information including where to find rust infect creeper you can email Kayla at projects@southerndirt.com.au she is very passionate and eager to spread the good news on how you can help.

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