Where Did June Go!

Our friends gathered around us and joined in the fun as 23,000 seedlings arrived earlier in the week. That was over two months ago now. Time has flown and the seedlings have grown. However here, belatedly; we take a peek at that first long weekend  in June and the days that followed. Larissa and Dave ready and firing away!

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Our thanks to Larissa, Carol, Hayley, Dave, Mark, Paul and eventually my son Tom who graciously assisted in planting our little seedlings into their new home on the eastern side of the creek and river. We proved the ground and placed them down, closing the soil around them so that they may thrive. We lucked out with the weather, the rain and cold cold forecast did not arrive. The food was abundant and the days flowed by. Happy days and nights indeed.

And so it began and we thought it would never end. Potty Putkis and stampers, feeding tubes and basket and basket went out all day long. However plenty of laughs and good food saw us down and dirty and ploughing through.

We both collapsed once the weekend was done with still quite a few thousand to be planted once our friends had gone. Over the days that followed Jorn, myself and naturally Jezabelle continued to plant. We were really glad when the job was finally done. Reporting to follow then in a moment we were gone! Thank you SWCC for the funds we received, and the land thanks you even more.

 

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The Window Opened, Strainer Posts IN

just ring, please….. Yes that intuitive sense kicked in and I felt there was a window of opportunity for us be able to use an amazing Post Rammer belonging to the gentle Kim Sanders, one of our local fencing contractors.

Timing was crazy, we had adjust arrived back from our holiday up north to the Pilbara and Jorn was re packed and headed down to Bellalee.

We have now managed to ram in the strainer posts and set our photo monitoring sites. I like to use strainer posts to make it easier for me.

All going well we will run the wire soon, then call Kayla to come and take a look at the finished project.

  Looking East Photo Monitoring Point 1
  Looking West Photo Monitoring Point 1    Looking East Photo Monitoring Point 2
    Looking West Photo Monitoring Point 2
      Looking East Photo Monitoring Point 1
   Looking West Photo Monitoring Point 2

Ridgey didge we need a light sabre errr life saver

“You do know where it is don’t you”, said Jorn as I happily announced we had been successful in obtaining funding from Southern Dirt for more re-generation work. “Yes, Land for Wildlife site 5”, says I, not really knowing where it was. Okay, over there as I clearly point to the map of the farm. Not really knowing exactly where, you know over there…

Apparently it is rocky ridge country, blink of eye lashes, and this means? River views? Location location in real estate parlance. Good Internet connection potential? Certainly none down at the house.

“How are we going to IMG_2022get the posts in”, clearly I think Jorn is having a lend of me, I am after all country born but lived most of my life as a city girl, I bring a smile and enthusiasm however very little practical knowledge….. I am good at the paper work and writing submissions for grants (apparently). My answer clearly, we do it the way we always do, with the Donnybrook donger Jorn made back in early 1980’s. Here is Jorn out one of the areas to be fenced under the 25th Anniversary Landcare project. Easy, flat, no rocks. We apparently need a little more that old faithful.

As luck and a few telephone calls would have it we have found our saviour in the form of Orchid Valley fencing contractor Kim Sanders. Over we went to visit with some test poles in hand. We use former electricity poles, a bit more work as we have to cut them to size however cheaper than commercially available poles and quicker than finding wood to use from the farm.

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Kim has opted in to rescue us! All we need is a little patience (something that I do not possess). Kim is in demand,very, very busy. However he along with his hydraulic post rammer and tractor are spot on for the task to ram the strainer posts into the very rocky ridges that is “Kayla’s Woodland”. (And yes there are views.)

Action plan implemented! The poles aka strainer posts, are all laid out ready to go. We just need to wait for a window of opportunity for the light sabre!

We could never have undertaken any of the work we have done without the unfailing generosity of friends and neighbours. Bellalee has been leased since the year 2000, thus the majority of the equipment used is begged and borrowed. We feel very blessed to have been able undertake this work.

Bridal Creeper and South African Reed given their exit orders

IMG_1095Six months ago we added Bridal Creeper to the list of weeds to eradicate/control at the farm. Kayla Ringrose from Southern Dirt was a fabulous teacher on the various ways to control Bridal Creeper. Six months later I walked through the areas we are targeting to check out the progress. (Keep in mind here this is a seven year programme!). Along the creek line luckily there was only one small patch, however not so lucky in other areas. Once again of I went, spray pack on my back on a murderous spree with the prescribed dosage of weed killer for the problem. Delighted to see very little re-growth after the long summer. Kayla stressed diligence was needed! The Bridal creeper here is in one of the areas soon to be fenced under our 25th Anniversary Landcare agreement.

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Spiny Rush is in an increasing problem in the local area. It can be found along drainage lines and low lying areas. Spiny Rush favours areas where its tolerance to salt allows it to out compete other plants and dominate. Choking waterways and providing harbour for foxes and rabbits, we have been working to control spiny rush before it can form into dense infestations. It can be easily confused with native rushes however once you get you eye it in it is easy to spot. Yes I spent a few days mattock in hand digging up spiny rush, section by section.

Like the Bridal Creeper this is a long term project to rid Bellalee of the invading pest!

Christmas came early for Bellalee

December 18th almost 300 community groups and individuals across Australia received a wonderful Christmas present. An email that let us know will we share in $5 million to enable communities to take practical action as part of the Australian Government’s National Landcare Programme. Yes we were one of the privileged successful individuals given the go ahead.

We are still pinching ourselves. This funding will allow us to neatly finish most of the regeneration recommendations we received in our original Land For Wildlife Report. That report marked the official start of this journey.

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Southern Dirt/State NRM Project

Southern Dirt/State NRM Project.

via Southern Dirt/State NRM Project.

Late December Regeneration update.

photo 1 photo 2Late December 2013 and here we are. The plants are very healthy and going the distance.

Tom (my eldest son), who was one of the volunteers at planting time, recently went down the farm with his mates for a short break from city life. He reported back to us and we are delighted with the progress and that the plants are thriving.

Our bush regeneration attempts to protect and enhance the plant biodiversity along Cockatoo Creek and the Tone River as they flow through Bellalie. We hope that we have provided conditions conductive to the recruitment and survival of our native seedlings. Plus it is envisaged that dormant seed stock will sprout adding to the bio-diversity.

Australian plant communities require some level of perturbation to trigger germination from long-buried seed banks. Some areas of the project were not only ripped and mounded but had additional disturbance-based burning to trigger new growth.

We are very proud to be involved in an active conservation program for remnant vegetation. The aim of this bush regeneration, is to restore and maintain ecosystem health by facilitating the natural regeneration of indigenous flora and to provide linked corridors for wildlife.

Thank you to the South West Catchment Council (SWCC), Land for Wildlife, and the the Department of Conservation for the grants we received and the invaluable assistance in guiding the projects.

we’ve only just begun!

We have signed of on one of our two projects. In this one project 52 hectares has been given back to assist regeneration of of the creek and river system. By the time we add both projects together over 100 hectares is now forming a corridor for wildlife and an ambitious regeneration plan to improve the biodiversity of the area.Image