we’ve only just begun!

We have signed of on one of our two projects. In this one project 52 hectares has been given back to assist regeneration of of the creek and river system. By the time we add both projects together over 100 hectares is now forming a corridor for wildlife and an ambitious regeneration plan to improve the biodiversity of the area.Image

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Empties!

Eventually we ran out of plants – they were planted!  It was almost and anti-climax when we didn’t have to return to the shearing shed to load more plants onto the trailer. On our return to Perth, we dropped into the Blyth Tree Farm in Katanning to return the trays to Steve.

Just some of the empty trays stacked up outside the shearing shed.

Just some of the empty trays stacked up outside the shearing shed.

Jezabel the dogess is in the background making sure all the trays are returned

Jezabel the dogess is in the background making sure all the trays are returned

Carol and Wanda the camper pleased that the work is complete!

Carol and Wanda the camper pleased that the work is complete!

Plants, plants everywhere there are plants

We would load up our buckets full of a variety of differing species and head down a mound.

We would load up our buckets full of a variety of differing species and head down a mound.

Carol and Cassie back at the trailer for more plants. Sometimes it seemed endless, head down and off we go - again....
Carol and Cassie back at the trailer for more plants. Sometimes it seemed endless, head down and off we go – again….

Yes we could always rely of Jezabel the dogess to cast her knowing eye over the proceedings.

Yes we could always rely of Jezabel the dogess to cast her knowing eye over the proceedings.

We fed everybody a hearty lunch. A combination of red lentil and spicy carrot soup, and a harissa soup with sourdough garlic bread, followed up with fruit and Evelyns fruits and nut cake. Yum!

We fed everybody a hearty lunch. A combination of red lentil and spicy carrot soup, and a harissa soup with sourdough garlic bread, followed up with fruit and Evelyns fruits and nut cake. Yum!

planting time

Jezabel supervising Cassie

Jezabel supervising Cassie

Wednesday June 10 and we are back in the city.

Now two weekends ago, it was a long weekend here in Western Australia. Many months of planning and fencing were about to see the plants not only arrive but be planted! Amazing. Over 16,500 native plants  were planted to create a bio diverse environment for wildlife. They have now all been given there place out on a mound.

Every plant have now been been planted on Bellalee. They were delivered by Steve Blyth from Blyth Tree Farm WA on Wednesday May 29th in the afternoon afternoon.

Out on site with a small selection of the plants

Out on site with a small selection of the plants

The plants will cover approximately 16 kilometres of mounds. We omitted to tell our wonderful team just how far they would walk… Even to me the scale seemed a little surreal.

Our thanks to our wonderful team:

Carol Canzirri , Alida and Bob Dohrmann, my eldest son Thomas Zaunmayr, his girlfriend Cassie Paxman, their friends Sarah Mullins and Alicia. 2.5 days of intense work over the Foundation Day long weekend. A special mention to the sustaining fruit and nut cake supplied kindly by Evelyn Bowen, plus the guidance given as usual by Jezabel the dogess.

A planting we will go

A planting we will go

Cassie watering the plants prior to us planting them
Cassie watering the plants prior to us planting them
Jezabel the dogess checking out progress

Jezabel the dogess checking out progress

— with Jorn Ramel.

Potty what? Ki, eh????

Jorn and Steve with two pottutkis he has loaned us to assist with the planting

Jorn and Steve with two pottutkis he has loaned us to assist with the planting

Phew a Pottiputki is an amazing Finnish invention from the 1970’s. specifically designed for manual tree planting. You may recall we have just under 18,000 to plant over the upcoming long weekend. Steve Blyth from Blyth Tree Farm supplied two of the planters we used. Local farmers, the Warberton’s supplied another two and good friend David Lee loaned another.  Fully kitted out of we set.

the planter strikes the Pottiputki  into the ground, you put the plant down the tube and stamp on the slide at the bottom of the devise. The mechanism does the planting as at the bottom of the devise are two claws that look a little like a duckbill. They open after pushing an opening into the ground for the plant. The claws open and drop the plant into the slot, you push the soil bank at your foot in to seal the young seedling into position and move on. Simple, especially 18,000 odd times……..

Well we were an odd wonderful lot of humans and the doggess Jezabel. Hard going left use thinking,….. Jorn Ramel came up with version two, an old 50 odd cm hexagon shaped wooden rod (a former roller from a blind), a a series of 50cm PVC tubes. One person went ahead stamping a slot into the ground and the planters followed, putting the plant down thw tube, stamping it closed and onto the next hole. Horray, horray, horray. EASY…. That is what we like.

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Jorn now with the wooden stamper…. i persevered with the pottiputki. Later I actually like to use it over the tubes.

Grounded pottiputki!
Grounded pottiputki!